'Foul play?' Report launched on alcohol marketing in UEFA 2016

News Release issued today on behalf of Scottish Health Action on Alcohol Problems (SHAAP), Institute for Social Marketing - University of Stirling, the Institute of Alcohol Studies (IAS), and Alcohol Action Ireland

A report launched today at the 'European Healthy Stadia' conference at the Emirates Stadium highlights how alcohol producers bent the rules designed to protect children during the UEFA Euro 2016 football tournament. Researchers at the Institute for Social Marketing, University of Stirling, found over 100 alcohol marketing references per televised match programme, mostly in highly visible places, such as pitch-side advertising during the matches. This despite the fact that the tournament was held in France, where alcohol TV advertising and sports sponsorship is banned under the ‘Loi Évin’. Read the report

SHAAP/SARN 'Alcohol Occasional' Seminar, 27th February 2017

'Alcohol admissions and health inequalities: is the tide finally turning?'

Neil Martin, Research and Information Manager for Balance, the North East Alcohol Office, presented research looking at the impact of inequalities on the healthcare system based on alcohol-specific hospital admissions from 2006 - 2015 covering 326 local authorities in England. Data showed an increase in such admissions, broken down into condition, gender and geographic region and Martin discussed their impact on NHS resources and life expectancy.

SHAAP/SARN 'Alcohol Occasional' Seminar, 24th January 2017

'How inclusive are we? A trans perspective on alcohol and drug misuse in Scotland'

Vic Valentine and Oceana Maund, of the Scottish Transgender Alliance, presented this seminar. Maund gave a testimonial about her experience of being a trans woman who has also faced alcohol and prescription drugs addition, and Valentine presented the details of the findings of a survey conducted by the Scottish Trans Alliance into transgender inclusion in drug and alcohol services.

SHAAP/SARN 'Alcohol Occasional' Seminar, 5th December 2016

'Does harm from drinking differ by socioeconomic status? Exploring the alcohol harm paradox'

Dr S Vittal Katikireddi, Senior Clinical Research Fellow and Honorary Consultant in Public Health, MSC/SCO, Social and Public Health Sciences Unit, University of Glasgow, began his presentation by defining the alcohol paradox and presented a range of hypotheses to explain it. Survey data shows that individuals in lower socioeconomic status groups consume alcohol at similar levels to their counterparts in higher socioeconomic groups; however, those lower socioeconomic status individuals suffer greater harm from this consumption – this is the alcohol harm paradox. Dr Katikireddi then presented findings from his current research which aimed to offer some explanations for the alcohol harm paradox.

Report of SHAAP/SARN 'Alcohol Occasional' seminar held at the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh on 5th December 2016.

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