Alcohol and Cancer Risks: A Guide for Health Professionals

The latest publication from SHAAP is Alcohol and Cancer Risks. This guide has been produced to summarise for Health Professionals the links between alcohol and consumption and cancers so that they can use opportunities in their work to intervene to reduce the risks. It was produced following an expert workshop which was convened by SHAAP. See Publications and Reports section for details.

Scotland’s mental health: Adults 2012 October 2012 NHS Health Scotland October 2012

Two indicators of mental health have worsened:
– possible alcohol dependency
– deaths from mental and behavioural disorders due to psychoactive substance use.

To improve Scotland’s mental health, priority should be given to the three indicators where there is solid evidence of worsening over the last decade or so: psychoactive substance-related deaths, alcohol dependency and manager support at work. The trends for deaths from mental and behavioural disorders due to psychoactive substance use and alcohol dependency are of particular concern.

Homicide in Scotland, 2011-12

Over two thirds, 68%, of the total of 124 persons accused in homicide cases in 2011-12 were reported to have been drunk and/or under the influence of drugs at the time of the homicide. Of these 124, 72 (58%) were drunk, 5 (4%) were on drugs, and 7 (6%) were both drunk and on drugs.

In 2011-12, three quarters of cases where the main accused was drunk and/or on drugs, the victim was also known to have been drunk and/or on drugs. Where the main motive for a homicide was a rage or fight, 93% of the main accused for whom the drink/drug status was known, were drunk and/or on drugs. In 84% of cases where the main accused was drunk and/or on drugs the victim was also drunk and/or on drugs at the time the homicide took place.

Scottish Health Survey Topic Report: Equality Groups (Scottish Government Publication 30th October 2012)

Scottish Health Survey Topic Report: Equality Groups
The report includes data on health behaviours and health characteristics broken down by the following equality groups: gender, age, ethnic group, religion, disability and sexual orientation.

By combining survey data from four consecutive years (2008-2011), more in-depth analysis of minority groups with small populations is possible. This report represents an important step forward in the availability of data on equality groups in Scotland.

The key points in relation to alcohol consumption are that:
• Men were more likely than women to drink at hazardous or harmful levels and to exceed the daily recommended alcohol units.
• Weekly alcohol consumption generally decreased with age, with 16-24 year olds consuming the most. The proportion exceeding daily limits was similar between the ages of 16 to 54 before declining for older groups.
• Pakistani, Chinese, Other Asian, and African, Caribbean or Black respondents were all significantly less likely to drink at hazardous or harmful levels than the national average.
• People who belonged to no religious group were most likely to drink excessively whilst Muslims, Hindus and Buddhists were the least likely religious groups to drink at hazardous or harmful levels.
• Respondents with a disability were less likely to drink excessively and to exceed daily limits than those who did not.
• Respondents who identified themselves as lesbian or gay were significantly more likely to drink at hazardous or harmful levels than the national average.

News Archive

SHAAP Twitter Feed

SHAAPALCOHOL @SHAAPALCOHOL @SARNalcohol invite you to the next lunchtime #Alcohol Occasional at @RCPEdin on 14th Feb to hear… https://t.co/pkq2WdqXnZ
18hreplyretweetfavorite
SHAAPALCOHOL RT @SARNalcohol: @UnhappyHippy @SHAAPALCOHOL @RCPEdin @DWAW_Glasgow Hi, it will not be recorded but it will be written up as a brief report…
22hreplyretweetfavorite